As part of our ongoing efforts to increase awareness of our culture and history, we have collected a number of objects, audiotapes, posters, books and videos and assembled them into kits available to schools and other organizations. These kits are an educational resource designed to share information on Native American history and culture from a contemporary Iroquois perspective.

 

ed kit image
The lesson plans and activities that accompany these kits may be tailored to fit all ages. Actual objects in the elementary school age kit include a baby or doll-sized traditional boy’s Iroquois outfit, a girl doll in a cradleboard, a ring and pin game that can be replicated by you, using reusable materials found at home and school, plus more! Chosen for their accuracy and authentic information, educational resources include books, videos, and posters that illustrate Native American history and culture from an Akwesasne Mohawk perspective.
thistle basket
Touch a “thistle” basket made from black ash splint and sweet grass while you learn about the award-winning basket makers of Akwesasne.
Use a flannel board that is filled with Iroquois symbolism.
Fill your classroom walls with posters based on Iroquois culture.
Listen to Iroquois legends and songs on audiotape, watch Iroquois dances on videotape.
See Mohawk students as they sit in their classroom – just like yours – on videotape.
Nia:wen (thanks) to our most recent renter, the Beekmantown Central School, in November 2008!
Here is a sample activity:
activity
One small paper plate.
One pencil
String
Scissors
Tape (optional)
Cut the center out of the paper plate. Cut a piece of string about 2 feet long. Tie one end of the string to the pencil, tie the other end to the outside edge of the paper plate. Use tape to help you keep the string in place, if needed. Hold the pencil with the tied end in your hand. Swing your arm so the plate goes up in the air and try to catch it with the end of the pencil. This activity is based on a game that was played by Native children across North America long ago. It helped to teach the hand-eye coordination that would be needed for hunting and fishing. The original materials would have been wood or bone instead of a pencil, sinew instead of string, and bone, leather, or rawhide instead of a paper plate. Most Native kids today play computer games and school sports like other North American kids. Did you know that lacrosse, a game popular in many schools and colleges today, was invented by Native people? There are many Native nations that play similar games, but it was the Mohawk form of the game (we call it Tewaarathon) that was seen by non-natives near the city of Montreal and was adapted by a Canadian named DeBeers into the modern game of lacrosse.  

Did you know that lacrosse is Canada’s national game?

 


Jr. High to Adult Education Kit
 

Native American history and culture take on new meaning with the use of this educational resource. Iroquois artists have “made it” in mainstream popular culture while not turning their backs on their own Native culture. Robbie Robertson (Mohawk) played with “The Band” and is now a solo artist, Charlie Hill (Oneida) is a comedian who has written for sitcoms like “Roseanne”, Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida) is a Grammy-winning recording artist. This kit includes a CD by Robertson, a video on Hill’s life, and a book co-written by Shenandoah.

 

Objects in the kit include a barrette beaded with a popular sports-related logo, a leather pouch with porcupine quill embroidery,a coffee cup and a full-sized flag that are contemporary expressions of a wampum belt that has held weighty significance for the Iroquois people since hundreds of years before European settlement in North America.

Chosen for their accuracy and authentic information, educational resources include books, videos, and posters that illustrate Native American history and culture from an Akwesasne Mohawk perspective.

 

  • Learn about recent great Mohawk athletes in Akwesasne Lacrosse.
  • Read about the Iroquois meaning of marriage.
  • See a taped interview with a Mohawk midwife.
  • Research the legal rights of Native Americans.
  • Watch Iroquois dances on videotape.
    • Here is a Sample Activity:

       

      Word Search

      This word search is based on terms that are explained in the resources available in our education kit. Print it out for use before using the kit, to pique interest and to show how much your group can expect to learn that is new to them!

      Printing tip: Highlight the word search puzzle and words before printing the selection.

       

       

      Skywoman
      Turtle Island
      Clans
      Peacemaker
      Great Law
      Tree of Peace
      Hotinonshonni
      Iroquois
      Tewaarathon
      Lacrosse
      Thanksgiving Address
      Two Row
      Wampum
      Covenant Chain
      Legends
      Hiawatha Belt
      Akwesasne
      Kwis and Tiio
      Six Nations
      Mohawk
      Oneida
      Onondaga
      Cayuga
      Seneca
      Tuscarora

       

      Copyright Akwesasne Cultural Center 2002